CFAO 61-1 PRECEDENCE(Note)
in Canada and the Canadian Armed Forces

crest of the Canadian Armed Forces (CF)


CFAO 61-6
PRECEDENCE

GENERAL


1. This order amplifies QR&O 3.43, which gives responsibility for determining precedence on a parade or at ceremonial functions to the parade commander or other officer in charge of military participation.

2. Depending on the circumstances, precedence will be determined on an individual basis; by component, formation, or unit; or by branch. The normal order of precedence will be respected in each case unless there are clear and obvious reasons to do otherwise.

3. Seniority, which has connotations of age and length of service, is only one of the factors that determine precedence.

ORDER OF PRECEDENCE FOR INDIVIDUALS

4. The order of precedence for individuals on occasions of state and ceremony in Canada, where state, ecclesiastical, judicial or other high ranking Canadian authorities are present, is shown in Annex A.

5. Members of the Royal Family, other than Her Majesty The Queen, when in Canada, take precedence after the Governor General.

6. The precedence of individual members of the Canadian Forces (CF) is noted in QR&O 3.09 to 3.12 and 3.41.

PRECEDENCE PRINCIPLES FOR COMPONENTS OF THE CANADIAN FORCES

7. The precedence for the components and sub-components of the CF is:

a. Regular Force;

b. Reserve Force-
(1) Primary Reserve,
(2) Supplementary Reserve -
(a) Supplementary Ready Reserve, and
(b) Supplementary Holding Reserve,
(3) Cadet Instructors List, and
(4) Canadian Rangers.

8. The Special Force, when authorized and established, shall take precedence with the Regular Force as if both formed the same component.

9. Operational and combat elements take precedence over logistic and supporting elements, followed by the training elements.

10. Formations take precedence over independent units. Within formations and units, the headquarters takes precedence.

11. The precedence among formations and units of a particular environment or functional branch shall be in accordance with the customs of that environment or branch. In general, precedence for each reflects a combination of status (Regular before Reserve, guards before line), numerical order and seniority of various types.

12. Where precedence of a unit embodied within a component is based on seniority, units that change status to a superior component (e.g., Reserve to Regular Force) take precedence within the new component in accordance with the date of change.

13. A unit formed from the amalgamation of two or more units inherits the rights and privileges of each, including any rights of precedence, according to the customs of the environment or branch concerned.

14. Where further conflict exists, precedence is determined by employing the former single Service tradition of the sea, followed by land and air elements, and then integrated formations and units.

JOINT PARADES

15. In joint parades held in Canada, in which troops of other nations or civilians participate, the order of precedence will be as follows:

a. forces of foreign and Commonwealth countries in English alphabetical order of countries, in accordance with United Nations protocol;

b. Canadian Forces;

c. Royal Canadian Mounted Police;

d. veterans, subject to paragraph 16;

e. Sea, Army, and Air Cadets; and

f. civilian organizations.

16. Veterans' organizations shall be given the position of honour on days of commemoration (CFAO 61-9, Days of Commemoration refers) and other memorial days.

CANADIAN FORCES PARADES

17. A parade commander normally shall determine precedence as follows:

a. decide if the customs for joint parades and remembrance or memorial days apply;

b. determine the structure of the major elements on parade. For example, are several commands or formations (whether or not with large attachments or detachments) on parade as such or is the parade composed of a number of individual units (eg, is the parade composed of 1 Brigade Group and 5 Brigade Group, each with its own commander and its subordinate units or other elements in order of precedence, or composed of a number of units drawn from these two brigades, each independently parading under its own commanding officer (CO), and all in a combined order of precedence);

c. if several commands or other formations are participating as such in a parade, each formation commander shall determine the order of precedence of units under that commander.

FORMATIONS AND UNITS

18. The order of precedence for the commands and major elements of the CF is:

a. by tradition, officer cadets of the Canadian Military Colleges when parading as a unit or detachment representing their college, in the following order --
(1) Royal Military College of Canada,
(2) Royal Roads Military College, and
(3) College militaire royal de Saint-Jean;

b. National Defence Headquarters;

c. Maritime Command;

d. Land Force Command;

e. Air Command;

f. Northern Region; and

g. Canadian Forces Training System (CFTS), when not formed as a subordinate formation as part of a single National Defence Headquarters (NDHQ) element.

19. Each commander shall determine the order of precedence of formations within that command or element based on the principles noted above. Normally, similar numbered formations take precedence in numerical order; e.g., First Canadian Destroyer Squadron, Fifth Canadian Destroyer Squadron.

20. Naval precedence among task groups, ships and other naval units is by personal rank and seniority of the commanders.

21. The order of precedence for units of the land field force is detailed in Annex B.

22. Flying squadrons take precedence in numerical order by Regular and then Reserve Forces.

PERSONNEL BRANCHES

23. Branches take precedence within the CF according to the single Service customs in place at unification, 1 Jan 68, or in the order of seniority for branches formed after that date. The order of precedence for branches is:

a. Naval Operations;

b. Armour (but see also Annex B, paragraph 2);

c. Artillery (but see also Annex B, paragraph 2);

d. Military Engineering;

e. Communications and Electronics;

f. Infantry;

g. Air Operations;

h. Logistics;

i. Medical;

j. Dental;

k. Electrical and Mechanical Engineering;

l. Chaplain;

m. Security;

n. Legal;

o. Administration;

p. Band;

q. Personnel Selection;

r. Training Development;

s. Physical Education and Recreation;

t. Public Affairs;

u. Intelligence; and

v. Postal.

24. Precedence among units of the same branch is in accordance with the customs of that branch.

(C) 1605-61-6 (DMTH)

Issued 1989-04-28

INDEX
Ceremonial
Parades
Precedence



CFAO 61-6
ANNEX A -
TABLE OF PRECEDENCE FOR CANADA


(Published by the Department of the Secretary of State of Canada effective 4 November 1993)

1. The Governor General of Canada or the Administrator of the Government of Canada. (Notes 1, 2, and 2.1).

2. The Prime Minister of Canada. (Note 3).

3. The Chief Justice of Canada. (Note 4).

4. The Speaker of the Senate.

5. The Speaker of the House of Commons.

6. Ambassadors, High Commissioners, Ministers Plenipotentiary. (Note 5)

7. The Members of the Cabinet with relative precedence governed by the date of their appointment to the Queen's Privy Council for Canada.

8. The Leader of the Opposition. (Subject to Note 3).

9. The Lieutenant Governor of Ontario;

The Lieutenant Governor of Quebec;

The Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia;

The Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick;

The Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba;

The Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia;

The Lieutenant Governor of Prince Edward Island;

The Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan;

The Lieutenant Governor of Alberta;

The Lieutenant Governor of Newfoundland. (Note 6).

10. Members of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada, not of the Canadian Ministry, in accordance with the date of their appointment to the Privy Council.

11. The Premiers of the Provinces of Canada in the same order as the Lieutenant Governors. (Note 6).

12. The Commissioner of the Northwest Territories;

The Commissioner of the Yukon Territory.

13. The Government Leader of the Northwest Territories

The Government Leader of the Yukon Territory

14. Representatives of faith communities (Note 7).

15. Puisne Judges of the Supreme Court of Canada.

16. The Chief Justice and the Associate Chief Justice of the Federal Court of Canada.

17. a. The Chief Justice of the highest court of each Province and Territory; and

b. The Chief Justices and the Associate Chief Justices of the other superior courts of the Provinces and Territories; with precedence within sub-categories a. and b. governed by the date of appointment as Chief Justice.

18. a. Judges of the Federal Court of Canada;

b. Puisne Judges of the superior courts of the Provinces and Territories;

c. the Chief Judge of the Tax Court of Canada;

d. the Associate Chief Judge of the Tax Court of Canada; and

e. Judges of the Tax Court of Canada; with precedence within each sub-category governed by the date of appointment.

19. Senators of Canada.

20. Members of the House of Commons.

21. Consuls-General of countries without diplomatic representation.

22. The Chief of the Defence Staff and the Commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. (Note 8).

23. The Speakers of Legislative Assemblies, within |their Provinces and Territory.

24. Members of Executive Councils, within their Provinces and Territory.

25. Judges of Provincial and Territorial Courts, within their Province and Territory.

26. Members of Legislative Assemblies, within their Province and Territory.

Notes -
1. The presence of the Sovereign in Canada does not impair or supersede the authority of the Governor General to perform the functions delegated to the Governor General under the Letters Patent constituting the office of the Governor General. The Governor General, under all circumstances, should be accorded precedence immediately after the Sovereign.

2. Precedence to be given immediately after the Chief Justice of Canada to former Governors General, with relative precedence among them governed by the date of their leaving office.

2.1 Precedence to be given immediately after the former Governors General to surviving spouses of deceased former Governors General (applicable only where the spouse was married to the Governor General during the latter's term of office), with the relative precedence among them governed by the dates on which the deceased Former Governors General left office.

3. Precedence to be given immediately after the surviving spouses of deceased former Governors General referred to in Note 2.1 to former Prime Ministers, with relative precedence among them governed by the dates of their first assumption of office.

4. Precedence to be given immediately after former Prime Ministers to former Chief Justices of Canada with relative precedence among them governed by the dates of their appointment as Chief Justice of Canada.

5. Precedence among Ambassadors and High Commissioners, who rank equally, to be determined by the date of the presentation of their credentials. Precedence to be given to Charges d'Affaires immediately after Ministers Plenipotentiary.

6. This provision does not apply to such ceremonies and occasions which are of a provincial nature.

7. The religious dignitaries will be senior Canadian representatives of faith communities having a significant presence in a relevant jurisdiction. The relative precedence of the representatives of faith communities is to be governed by the date of their assumption in their present office, their representatives being given the same relative precedence.

8. This precedence to be given to the Chief of the Defence Staff and the Commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police on occasions when they have official functions to perform, otherwise they are to have equal precedence with Deputy Ministers, with their relative position to be determined according to the respective dates of their appointments to office. The relative precedence of Deputy Ministers and other high officials of the public service of Canada is to be determined from time to time by the Minister of Canadian Heritage in consultation with the Prime Minister.

Issued 1989-04-28



CFAO 61-6
ANNEX B -
PRECEDENCE OF LAND FIELD FORCE


GENERAL


1. The precedence of the land field force is based on the former army corps structure.

FUNCTIONAL UNITS

2. Precedence among units of the land field force follows the same order as that for branches, except that:

a. units of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery take precedence over Armour Branch units (see also Note 1); and

b. service battalions take precedence according to that of their senior component, ie, after infantry and before medical units.

ARMOURED REGIMENTS

3. Order of precedence for armoured regiments is as follows (an asterisk* indicates both Regular and Reserve Force components):

a. Regular Force

(1) The Royal Canadian Dragoons,
(2) Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians), and
(3) 12e Regiment blinde du Canada*.
b. Militia
(1) The Governor General's Horse Guards,
(2) 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise's),
(3) The Elgin Regiment,
(4) The Ontario Regiment,
(5) The Queen's York Rangers (1st American Regiment),
(6) Sherbrooke Hussars,
(7) 12e Regiment blinde du Canada (Militia)*.
(8) 1st Hussars,
(9) The Prince Edward Island Regiment,
(10) The Royal Canadian Hussars (Montreal),
(11) The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own),
(12) The South Alberta Light Horse,
(13) The Saskatchewan Dragoons,
(14) The King's Own Calgary Regiment,
(15) The British Columbia Dragoons,
(16) The Fort Garry Horse,
(17) Le Regiment de Hull, and
(18) The Windsor Regiment.

INFANTRY REGIMENTS

4. Order of precedence for infantry regiments is as follows (an asterisk* indicates both Regular and Reserve Force components):

a. Regular Force
(1) The Royal Canadian Regiment*,
(2) Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry,
(3) Royal 22e Regiment*, and
(4) Canadian Airborne Regiment.

b. Militia

(1) Governor General's Foot Guards,
(2) The Canadian Grenadier Guards,
(3) The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada,
(4) The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada,
(5) Les Voltigeurs de Quebec,
(6) The Royal Regiment of Canada,
(7) The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (Wentworth Regiment),
(8) The Princess of Wales' Own Regiment,
(9) The Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment,
(10) The Lincoln and Welland Regiment,
(11) The Royal Canadian Regiment*,
(12) The Highland Fusiliers of Canada,
(13) The Grey and Simcoe Foresters,
(14) The Lorne Scots (Peel, Dufferin and Halton Regiment),
(15) The Brockville Rifles,
(16) Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders,
(17) Les Fusiliers du Saint-Laurent,
(18) Le Regiment de la Chaudiere,
(19) Royal 22e Regiment*,
(20) Les Fusiliers Mont-Royal,
(21) The Princess Louise Fusiliers,
(22) The Royal New Brunswick Regiment,
(23) The West Nova Scotia Regiment,
(24) The Nova Scotia Highlanders,
(25) Le Regiment de Maisonneuve,
(26) The Cameroon Highlanders of Ottawa,
(27) The Royal Winnipeg Rifles,
(28) The Essex and Kent Scottish,
(29) 48th Highlanders of Canada,
(30) Le Regiment du Saguenay,
(31) The Algonquin Regiment,
(32) The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada (Princess Louise's),
(33) The Lake Superior Scottish Regiment,
(34) The North Saskatchewan Regiment,
(35) The Royal Regina Rifles,
(36) The Rocky Mountain Rangers,
(37) The Loyal Edmonton Regiment (4th Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry),
(38) The Queen's Own Cameroon Highlanders of Canada,
(39) The Royal Westminster Regiment,
(40) The Calgary Highlanders,
(41) Les Fusiliers de Sherbrooke,
(42) The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada,
(43) The Canadian Scottish Regiment (Princess Mary's),
(44) The Royal Montreal Regiment,
(45) Irish Regiment of Canada,
(46) The Toronto Scottish Regiment, and
(47) The Royal Newfoundland Regiment.

Notes -
1. The Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, when on parade with their guns, take the right and march past at the head of all units of the land field force, including army elements of military colleges.

2. Officer cadets of the Canadian Military Colleges take precedence over all land field forces when parading as a unit or detachment representing their college, except as provided in Note 1. At all other times they parade with the unit of the branch to which they are attached.

3. Except as provided in Notes 4 and 5, armoured and infantry regiments take precedence within their branch according to the date of origin of the oldest unit that formed the regiment.

4. Units of guards (horse or foot) take precedence over other units within their branch, regardless of the date of origin, and, in turn, take precedence amongst themselves according to the date they became guards.

5. An armoured or infantry regiment with both Regular and Reserve Force components takes precedence within the Reserve Force according to the regiment's date of origin, and within the Regular Force according to the date its Regular Force component became part of that Force.

6. Numbered infantry and service battalions take precedence amongst themselves within their own position in the line in numerical order.

Issued 1989-04-28

(Note: Canadian Forces Administrative Orders {CFAO} 61-1 "Precedence" has been absorbed into Canadian Forces publication A-AD-200-000/AG-000, "The Honours, Flags and Heritage Structure of the Canadian Forces" which is not readily available through the Internet. This unofficial website is, at least for now, your easiest access to this information.TRG)

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PRECEDENCE in Canada and the Canadian Armed Forces / Timothy R. Groulx / Tim Groulx
Lakewood Appraisal Services

13 October 2002